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The risks of cancer development in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Author information

Song L1, Wang Y2, Zhang J2, Song N2, Xu X3, Lu Y4.

Abstract

Author information Arthritis Res Ther. 2018 Dec 6;20(1):270. doi: 10.1186/s13075-018-1760-3. 1 Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, 210029, China. 2 Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, 210029, China. 3 Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, 210029, China. xiaoyunhl@126.com. 4 Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, 210029, China. luyan6289@163.com.

Abstract BACKGROUND: Although accumulating data have suggested the development of cancer in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, these results remain inconsistent. To examine such a putative association, this analysis reports the association between SLE and the risks of 24 cancer types.

METHODS: Online databases PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched comprehensively for eligible studies, published up to 15 May 2018. Pooled standardized incidence rates (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were utilized to reveal their associations.

RESULTS: A total of 24 eligible studies were ultimately enrolled. Our results indicated that SLE was associated with increased risk of overall cancers, cancer risk in both genders, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, leukemia, multiple myeloma, cervix, vagina/vulva, renal, bladder, esophagus, gastric, hepatobiliary, lung, oropharynx, larynx, non-melanoma skin, and thyroid cancers. Additionally, SLE could reduce the risk of prostate cancer and cutaneous melanoma; however, it was not significantly associated with breast, uterus, ovarian, pancreatic, colorectal, or brain cancers.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results shed light SLE being correlated with increased risk for 16 involved cancers and decreased risk for prostate cancer and cutaneous melanoma. This comprehensive meta-analysis provides epidemiological evidence supporting the associations between SLE and cancer risk. This evidence could be utilized to drive public policies and to help guide personalized medicine to better manage SLE and reduce associated cancer morbidity and mortality.